Tag: Jonathan Edwards

Christian Thinkers 101: A Crash Course on Jonathan Edwards

Photo Credit: Public Domain Puritan theologian Jonathan Edwards may be one of America’s greatest thinkers, but what exactly did he believe and what else did he contribute to Christianity? Here’s your crash course on the life and accomplishments of Jonathan Edwards—and why he still matters today. Who Was Jonathan Edwards? Jonathan Edwards (1703–1758) was born in New England in colonial…

Interview with Dr. Travis Campbell

Through RTB’s Visiting Scholar Program, we often have the pleasure of hosting and working with experts in various fields of study. This summer theologian Dr. Travis Campbell spent two months at RTB headquarters penning articles and recording podcasts. Dr. Campbell received his PhD in philosophical theology from Westminster Theological Seminary (Philadelphia) in 2004, and currently serves as a history teacher…

Jonathan Edwards: An Awakening of Heart and Mind, Part 2

Like Christians today, revivalist preacher Jonathan Edwards (1703–1758) faced an intellectual climate that challenged biblical truth-claims. Edwards’ steadfast convictions and ability to integrate reason (the mind) and personal devotion (the heart) helped him remain unwavering in his dedication to the sovereign God revealed in creation and Scripture. Part 1 of this two-part series summarizes Edwards’ life and theology. Here, in…

Jonathan Edwards: An Awakening of Heart and Mind, Part 1

A sense of God’s majesty combined with desire for deep spiritual intimacy characterizes one of America’s greatest evangelical thinkers.1 Known as the theologian of God’s sovereignty, Jonathan Edwards (1703–1758) made enduring contributions in the fields of theology, philosophy, and the psychology of religion. A nurturing pastor, frontier missionary, and bold revivalist preacher of the gospel of Jesus Christ, Edwards exemplifies…

Ten Historic Christian Theological Texts

Throughout history, these theological books have impacted both the church and the world. I chose these works in order to provide a broad scope of historic Christian thought, although I do not necessarily agree with every point these authors make. But whatever your branch of Christendom or denominational attachment, I do encourage you to consider these books for your theological…