Author: Kenneth

Philosopher and theologian, senior research scholar for Reasons To Believe. Check out my blog, Reflections--we are what we think.

Historical Reflections on the Pandemic

Few things in life get your attention like the subject of infectious disease. And this is especially true of pandemics (“all people” threatened by illness). It is, of course, natural to experience fear and concern during extraordinary times like this. There is great alarm about the illness and death caused by the coronavirus both in our country and worldwide. And there is also…

How to Distinguish between Science and Scientism

Science is truly one of the great intellectual enterprises that humankind has ever developed. But what exactly is science? Is it mainly a narrow method or practice for obtaining knowledge about the natural world? Or does it involve a broad philosophical system? I respect and appreciate science and I enjoy interacting with scientists. But my background in logic and philosophy motivates me…

4 Philosophical Nuggets You Can Use

Can we learn much from brief philosophical statements? Regular readers of my blog know that I occasionally feature the segment Friday Philosophy, where I provide quotes from profound philosophical thinkers both past and present. A contemporary philosopher that I appreciate is professor David Naugle. Naugle’s book Reordered Love, Reordered Lives: Learning the Deep Meaning of Happiness has been very helpful to me in…

1917: A Movie about Choices, Character, Courage

The historical conflict goes by a number of names: the Great War, the War to End All Wars, and later, World War I (1914–1918). Though World War II (1939–1945) caused far more destruction and higher death tolls, some Europeans who lived through both catastrophic wars—such as J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis—thought the First World War was more jarring…

How to Appreciate Early Jesus Symbols

As someone who calls himself a “historic Christian,” I am very interested in learning as much as I can about the person of Jesus Christ. My interest extends to an appreciation of early Christian art and especially symbols that use Greek and Latin letters to represent the person of Jesus Christ. These early alphabetic artistic symbols were common in the…

Learning from Christian Thinkers of the Past

How do Christians live out their faith in an age often critical of their distinctive beliefs and values? And how can they successfully communicate their faith to others and defend it effectively when it is challenged? Models for Today A great resource available to us today for learning how to live a consequential Christian life can be found in the past. Church…

Wednesday Wisdom from Thinker Marvin Olasky

If you’re like me, you appreciate learning about and living by the wisdom of others. Many Christians, past and present, serve as examples for us. One such thinker is also one of my favorite writers and journalists, Dr. Marvin Olasky. His articles, especially his book lists, in World Magazine always draw my attention. A couple of years ago he even highlighted my book…

Did Augustine Lead the Ancient Church Astray?

Anybody who has heard my podcast, listened to my theological lectures, reviewed my Reflections blog, or read my books will know that I have a special appreciation for St. Augustine of Hippo (AD 354–430). He is my favorite Christian thinker outside of the Bible, though just a little ahead of other great Christian thinkers like St. Athanasius, Blaise Pascal, and…

Friday Philosophy from Peter Kreeft

Let me introduce you to the latest influential thinker in my ongoing social media segment, #FridayPhilosophy. Contemporary philosopher Peter Kreeft inspired me as a young college student. After reading Kreeft’s book Between Heaven and Hell: A Dialogue Somewhere beyond Death with John F. Kennedy, C. S. Lewis & Aldous Huxley, I wanted to study philosophy and Christian apologetics. What follows is a brief biography…

A Movie to Make You Think: The Two Popes

The great Yale church historian Jaroslav Pelikan once called the Roman Catholic Church ʺthe most formidable religious institution in the history of America and of the world.ʺ1 One distinguishing doctrinal feature of Catholicism is the claim that the pope is the official leader of Christendom. Of the three branches of Christendom (Orthodoxy, Catholicism, Protestantism), Catholics uniquely view the pope as sitting…