Author: Kenneth

Philosopher and theologian, senior research scholar for Reasons To Believe. Check out my blog, Reflections--we are what we think.

Take Up and Read: The Republic

  This current blog series on Reflections is intended to encourage Christians to read more vigorously by providing a beginner’s guide to some of the Christian classics in such fields as theology, philosophy, and apologetics. Hopefully, a brief introduction to these important Christian texts will motivate today’s believers—as St. Augustine was called to in his dramatic conversion to Christianity—to “take up and…

The Ache of the Soul

A common Christian description of the human condition is that people as sinners are alienated, lost, and cut off from God. Being out of sync with their Creator and themselves, people are unable to find truly enduring fulfillment and satisfaction in life. And yet, the human longing and desire for meaning, purpose, and significance continues to churn in the human…

Take Up and Read: Loving Wisdom

This current blog series on Reflections is intended to encourage Christians to read more vigorously by providing a beginner’s guide to some of the Christian classics in such fields as theology, philosophy, and apologetics. My hope is that these introductions to important Christian texts will motivate today’s believers to, as St. Augustine put it, “take up and read” (Latin: Tolle lege) these classic books.…

Argument from Desire and Abductive Reasoning

One way human beings clearly differ from the animals is in their inner existential longings. Many people describe experiencing an innermost yearning for a deeper meaning and purpose to life, and sometimes even a secret desire for God and eternal life. But why do people experience such longings? And do such existential yearnings reflect something more than mere human subjectivity?…

Take Up and Read: The Dictionary of Cultural Literacy

  This current blog series on Reflections is intended to encourage Christians to read more vigorously by providing a beginner’s guide to some of the Christian classics in such fields as theology, philosophy, and apologetics. My hope is that these brief introductions to important Christian texts will motivate today’s believers to, as St. Augustine put it, “take up and read” (Latin: Tolle lege) these…

A Dozen Book Favorites, Part 3

As I wrote in parts one and two of this three-part series, only human beings read books. The great Greek philosopher Aristotle thought the distinguishing feature of people is their ability to use language. And humans use their unique language ability to think, speak, write, and read. From a historic Christian perspective, the idea of human exceptionalism is grounded in the biblical truth that people are…

A Dozen Book Favorites, Part 2

As I wrote in part one of this series, only human beings are readers. The ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle thought the distinguishing feature of people is their ability to use language. And humans use their unique language ability to think, speak, write, and read. From a historic Christian viewpoint, the idea of human uniqueness is grounded in the biblical truth…

A Dozen Book Favorites, Part 1

Only human beings read. The great Greek philosopher Aristotle thought the distinguishing feature of people is their ability to use language. And humans use their unique language ability to think, speak, write, and read. From a historic Christian perspective, the idea of human exceptionalism is grounded in the biblical truth that people are made in the image of God (Genesis…

Take Up and Read: On the Trinity

This current blog series on Reflections is intended to encourage Christians to read more vigorously by providing a beginner’s guide to some of the Christian classics in such fields as theology, philosophy, and apologetics. Hopefully a very brief introduction to these important Christian texts will motivate today’s believers, as St. Augustine was called to in his dramatic conversion to Christianity, to “take…

Promoting Truth, Unity, and Charity within Christendom

While the traditional elements of Catholicism, Protestantism, and Orthodoxy hold much, if not most, in common—at least doctrinally speaking (reflected in the ancient ecumenical creeds)—individuals within these historic subdivisions of Christendom sometimes give the impression that the three branches are almost completely divided. Correspondingly, when listening to conservative Lutherans, Reformed, Methodists, and Baptists debating theology, the impression may be left that Protestants…