Five Science-Faith Resources for Homeschoolers

It’s the most wonderful time of the year if you’re a homeschool parent. As the school year comes to a close, many homeschoolers are already looking down the corridors of time preparing for the fall—and, before next year, one of their first stops will be a local homeschool convention.

200411993-001Reasons to Believe (RTB) is excited to participate in five education conventions this year: four homeschool conventions (Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Des Moines, and Seattle) and one classical school teacher’s convention (Austin). We will conduct workshops at each of these conferences, encouraging parents and educators to seek out curriculum options that promote the harmony of the Bible and science.

Last year, I had the privilege of presenting during several workshops for homeschool parents in Oklahoma. I had a great time interacting with attendees as I presented RTB’s unique approach to science education. Feel free to check it out here.

Though RTB is primarily an outreach ministry, through the years we’ve developed an education branch that seeks to help teachers and parents equip young people to understand, articulate, and defend their faith with gentleness and respect. If you aren’t familiar with what RTB offers in terms of curriculum and educator resources, allow me to give you a quick tour.

Psalm 104 Unit Study — This is a brand new resource that guides elementary (grades 3–6) students through a unit study based on Psalm 104. If you’ve been looking for a curriculum that integrates an old-earth creation perspective of science with the Bible, you’ll definitely want to check this out. This curriculum will introduce students to some of the foundational ideas of the harmony between God’s Word and God’s world.

Through the Lens ­— RTB scholars lead students through a series of discussions on critical scientific topics. Designed for use by homeschoolers and Christian school educators, these 10-minute videos are compatible with any curriculum, secular or Christian. Through the Lens can be used to supplement traditional science textbooks and provide a starting point for discussions with students about science-faith issues.

Good Science, Good Faith — This is RTB’s high school science apologetics course. This year-long elective combines what students have learned in their science textbooks with the best biblical research. The first half of the course lays the biblical foundation for integrating the Bible with modern science, while the second half explores the differences between the worldviews of creationism and naturalism. You can take a video tour of this curriculum and download a sample lesson here.

Educator’s Help Desk — This is RTB’s educational hub where teachers and parents can watch coaching videos, listen to podcasts, access archives for education-related articles, and more. Best of all, vistors can explore a variety of old-earth-friendly curricula options.

Continuing Education Courses — ACSI teachers and administrators can receive continuing education units in biblical studies through RTB. These courses are also ideal for homeschool parents who want to get equipped to teach science to their kids. No written assignments. Just listen and learn. All courses are web-based and on-demand. Check out the informational video here.

As you can see, we’ve come a long way in improving our resources for classroom and home educators. We’re grateful for God’s provision as we continue to progress in the education arena.

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By Krista Bontrager

Krista Bontrager is the dean of online learning at Reasons to Believe. She is a teacher at heart and enjoys teaching the Bible to all ages. She has an MA in theology and another in Bible exposition from Talbot School of Theology.

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