Monthly Archives: March 2012

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Quote of the Week: Michael Green

 The evidence for the Christian case is very strong. Though incapable of compelling faith, it is quite sufficient to warrant it.

–Michael Green, Runaway World (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity, 1976), 36.

Thinking about Suffering and Death, Part 4

Christians often talk about what it means to live well but seldom do they discuss what it means to die well. So what is a “good death”? In the context of hospice, the concept of a good death involves the easing of a dying person’s suffering. But in the broader scope of life, what constitutes a good death? Continue reading

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Quote of the Week: Gary Kirby and Jeffery R. Goodpaster

We often define ourselves by our actions. In a way, we are what we do, but perhaps more than we realize, we are what we think.

– Gary R. Kirby and Jeffery R. Goodpaster, Thinking (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1995), xiii.

Thinking about Suffering and Death, Part 3

Courage is a virtue that I’ve always admired and respected. Growing up I was deeply impressed and proud of my father’s strength and valor as a frontline combat soldier in World War II. By extension, I appreciate and respect all people—such as noble police officers, firefighters, and soldiers—who willingly put their life on the line for others. Continue reading

Thinking about Suffering and Death, Part 2

Whether it was losing a loved one, becoming the victim of a violent crime, or facing a life-threatening illness, my immediate reaction to experiences of genuine suffering has been a profound feeling of being alone in that condition. I don’t know if other people react that way to sorrow. For me, suffering is a deeply personal issue that I don’t often discuss with other people. But I recently heard Christian psychologist Jim Wilder state that people who undergo trauma often lose a sense of relationship for a time—thus feeling personally detached and numb. Continue reading

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Quote of the Week: St. Augustine, 3

Augustine on the creation days of Genesis:

What kind of days these are is difficult or even impossible for us to imagine, to say nothing of describing them.

– Augustine, City of God, trans. Henry Bettenson (New York: Penguin Classics, 1984), book 11, chapter 6, 436.

 

Thinking about Suffering and Death, Part 1

Take it from me, here are two words you never want to hear come out of your doctor’s mouth—“brain cancer!”

Last May, hall of fame baseball catcher Gary Carter was diagnosed with this dreaded illness. When I read the sad news that Carter’s most recent MRI revealed new tumors in his brain, I felt a deep sense of empathy for him and his suffering. Unfortunately, just a couple of weeks later, in February of this year, Carter died of the cancer. Continue reading

Top 10 Lakers of All Time

It’s basketball season and I can’t let it go by without commenting on my favorite team. I’ve been a Los Angeles Lakers fan since the late 1960s. So here is my list of the greatest Lakers players through the decades (in historical order only). Continue reading

Blaise’s Best Bet, Part 6: Pascal’s Wager Continued

Blaise Pascal’s famous wager argues that believing in God’s existence is a safer bet than not believing. Before examining the strengths and weaknesses of Pascal’s proposed gamble, we must understand the context in which it arose and how Pascal1 intended it to be used as an apologetics tool. Four points of clarification2 are helpful in this regard. Continue reading

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Quote of the Week: Albert Speer

According to Winston Churchill, Albert Speer was the most important Nazi because his competence in managing the German war machine (as minister of armaments and munitions) lengthened the war by two years. Yet as the powerful quote below reveals, Speer joined the Nazi Party without applying critical thinking. A lesson for the ages (1 Thessalonians 5:21). Continue reading